Home > Business Intelligence, ECM, legal > Seven even deadlier sins of Information Governance

Seven even deadlier sins of Information Governance

Devin Krugly published a very interesting blog/article, describing the “The 7 Deadly Sins of Information Governance“. I enjoyed the article, and I can’t find anything to disagree with, but I have to admit that it left me wanting… The 7 sins presented by Devin are well known and very common problems that plague most Enterprise scale projects, as he points out within the article itself. They could equally apply to HR, supply chain, claims processing or any other major IT implementation. Devin has done a great job of projecting these pitfalls to an Information Governance program.

For me, however, what is really missing from the article is a list of “sins” that are unique to Information Governance projects. So let me try and add some specific Information Governance colour to the picture… Here is my list of seven even deadlier sins:

Governance needs a government. Information governance touches the whole of the organisation. It touches every system, every employee and every process. Decisions therefore that govern information, must be taken by a well defined governance body, that accurately represents the business, compliance, legal, audit and IT, at the very least. You cannot solve the Information Governance problem by throwing technology at it. Sure, technology plays a key part as an enabler, a catalyst and as an automation framework. But technology cannot determine policy, priorities, responsibility and accountability. Nor can it decide the organisation’s appetite for risk, or changes in strategic direction. For that, you need a governing body that defines and drives the implementation of governance.

Information does not mean data. I have talked about this in an earlier blog (Data Governance is not about Data). We often see Information Governance projects that focus primarily (or even exclusively) on transactional data, or data warehousing, or records management, or archiving, etc. Information Governance should be unified and consistent. There isn’t a different regulator for data, for documents, for emails or for tweeter messages. ANY information that enters, leaves or stays in the organisation should be subject to a common set of Governance policies and guidelines. The technical implementation a may be different but the governance should be consistent.

It is a marathon not a sprint. You can never run an “Information Governance Project”. That would imply a defined set of deliverables and a completion point at some specific date. As long as your business changes (new products, new suppliers, new customers, new employees, new markets, new regulations, new infrastructure, etc.) your Information Governance needs will also change. Policies will need revising, responsibilities will need adjusting, information sources will need adding and processes re-evaluating. Constantly! If your Information Governance project is “finished”, frankly, so is your business.

Keep it lean and clean. Information governance is the only cure for Content Obesity. Organisations today are plagued by information ROT (information that is Redundant, Outdated or Trivial).  A core outcome of any Information Governance initiative should be the regular disposal of redundant information which has to be done consistently, defensibly and with the right level of controls around it. It is a key deliverable and it requires both the tools and the commitment of the governing body.

Remember: Not who or how, but why Information Governance projects often get tangled up in the details. Tools, formats, systems, volumes, stakeholders, stewards, regulators, litigators, etc., become the focus of the project and, more often the not, people forget the main driver: Businesses need good, clean and accessible information to operate. The primary role of Information Governance is to deliver accurate, timely and reliable information to the business, for making decisions, for creating products and for delivering services. Every other issue must come second in priority.

The ministry of foreign affairs. The same way that a country cannot be governed without due consideration to the relationship with its neighbours, Information Governance does not stop at the company’s firewall. Your organisation continuously trades information with suppliers, customers, partners, competitors and the wider community. Each of these exchanges has value and carries risks. Monitoring and managing the quality, the trustworthiness, the volume and the frequency of the information exchanged, is a core part of Information Governance and should be clearly articulated in the relevant policies and implemented in the relevant systems.

This is not a democracy, it’s a revolution. Implementing Information Governance is not an IT project, it is a business transformation project. Not only because of its scope and the potential benefit and risk that it represents, but also because of the level of commitment and engagement it requires from every part of the organisation. Ultimately, Information Governance has a role in enforcing information quality, regulatory and legal controls, and it is contributing to the organisation’s accountability. The purpose of on Information Governance implementation is not to ensure that everyone is happy and has an equal voice on the table. The purpose is to ensure that the organisation does the right thing and behaves responsibly. And that may require significant cultural change and a few ruffled feathers…

If you don’t already have an Information Governance initiative in your organisation, now is the time to raise the issue to the board. If you do, then you should carefully consider if the common pitfalls presented here are addressed by your program, or if you are in danger of committing one or more of these sins.

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  1. jhagmann2012
    November 1, 2012 at 12:30 pm

    In some organizations, Info Gov roles are suicide roles (there was a discussion about this on LinkedIn). I confirm that it’s a huge revolution and a business transformation project to become program (should not remain just a project). Information lifecycle governance needs the buy in from the business (see my review of Soares book “Selling governance to the business): http://jhagmann.twoday.net/stories/75232619/) – it’s hard and then it’s also about the HOW to speak with Dov Seidman (www.howsmatter.com) , because it’s all about politics and diplomacy to get the relevant stakeholders at the table, and pulling at the same rope. Of course not for happiness but to achieve desireable behavior to outbehave (not outperform) your competitors. When I look back to my previous project , light years away ….It’s an immature concept yet and we have to be very careful when using IG as a buzzword for everything and nothing. Academics are just starting to think about (e.g. Amsterdam Univ.) , see: http://jhagmann.twoday.net/stories/97003434/
    A lot of IT people confuse IT governance with information governance (and yeahh, it’s not about data) – Cobit also jumped on governance now with the new version 5
    jh

    • parapadakis
      November 1, 2012 at 1:32 pm

      Thanks Jurg, I think you are absolutely right: We need to be very clear on how we use the terminology. IG has always been (and should always remain) a business function. IT may be responsible for providing services and executing on policies, but ultimately the key stakeholders for IG are always operations, legal and compliance. In terms of the confusion between IT and Information Governance, it is the same confusion we often see between IT and Corporate Governance: Same guiding principles of control and transparency, but in very different domains. Thanks for your links. I have not got Sunil’s book yet, but it’s on my list!
      George

  1. April 24, 2013 at 6:20 pm

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